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FDA’s Approval of First NGS-Based IVD for NSCLC Raises New Question: Where Does This Leave LDTs?

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Guest Blog
by Joydeep Goswami, President, Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing and Oncology, Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Joydeep Goswami

FDA’s recent decision to grant premarket approval of the first next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based companion diagnostic for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) marks an important milestone in precision medicine. Patients and their oncologists now have access to an in vitro diagnostic (IVD) that can help expedite the selection of targeted therapies in days, a key advancement considering traditional testing methods can take several weeks for an answer — time that many NSCLC patients simply don’t have.

While this is great news for one segment of the more than 1.6 million estimated new cases of cancer that will be diagnosed in 2017,1 what options are available for the rest of the patients battling this disease and for which there is no approved IVD? There has been a lot of debate about laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) versus IVD testing, particularly as to whether to stop the use of LDTs or to regulate them. In the fast-moving field of oncology, where the power of understanding the disease and the selection of precision treatments are being improved rapidly by technologies like NGS, clinicians and oncologists want to be able to incorporate these latest advancements into their clinical diagnostic practices.

While IVD tests undoubtedly are the gold standard in terms of demonstrating clinical validity and utility, developing an IVD can take several years. Patients and doctors dealing with fast moving and fatal diseases like cancer do not have the luxury of waiting until an IVD test is developed and approved in order to have access to a viable test. On the other hand, LDTs allow clinicians and pathologists to validate a diagnostic much faster under the appropriate controls and quality guidelines from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP).

Although LDTs do not meet the same gold standard achieved by FDA-approved IVD tests, they do provide patients and clinicians with a much-needed option and quicker access to the latest advances in science while an equivalent IVD test is being developed. LDTs thus speed the path and utilization of the latest biological discoveries and technological innovations for the benefit of patients. Banning them or over-regulating them could have a negative impact both on innovation and, more importantly, patient access.

But there may be a solution that would enable patients to reap the benefits provided by both testing approaches. In one scenario, FDA could mandate labs to switch from an LDT to an equivalent IVD once one is approved. Alternatively, considering the much more rigorous validation process that an IVD product has to undergo, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and FDA could work together to encourage their use by setting reimbursement levels for IVDs higher than those associated with LDTs. Such measures could more effectively balance patient safety concerns with the right to benefit from cutting-edge science immediately.

1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures. 2017. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2017.html. Accessed July 11, 2017.

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